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ewnor asked:

Your post about drinks under a microscope caused one of my friendship. I thought I was the only girl in my class who loved weird sciencey stuff, and I felt a bit alone because of that feeling. However, a girl in my project group wanted to proscrastinate and begun to show me stuff on Tumblr, and showed me your post (that I'd already reblogged), and we begun a long conversation about fun sciencey stuff, and so that's how I became friends with a fellow science girl =)

Awww that’s a lovely message! Thanks for that that made our day! Actually that’s how me and Sam became friends because we both were (still are) cray cray about science and generally. Treasure your fellow nerd, have a great day. x

Jie

Schizophrenia - Myth VS Reality

  1. Schizophrenic patients are violent! - Actually it’s mostly sensationalised in the media and a very small proportion of schizophrenic patients are even remotely violent. They would experience hallucinations (i.e. voices in their heads) which they have ABSOLUTELY no control over due to a disruption in a neurological signal in the brain. They are actually a highly vulnerable group of patients which is why they need a bit more empathy and adequate management from everyone including healthcare professionals.
  2. Schizophrenia is a character flaw, like a split personality - It is a different mental illness from having a split personality altogether, it is true that patients may experience episodes of depression and low mood followed by active paranoia however they are not the same. 
  3. Schizophrenia is completely genetic and you can’t recover from it - There is about 1% heredity link for schizophrenia however it is multifactoral illness that can stem from environmental factors and other forms of mental disorder such as manic depression. The truth is you can recover from it with the right kind of care, however just like any mental illness, relapses can occur and the degree of severity varies from patient to patient.
  4. Schizophrenic patients won’t take their medicine because they are paranoid - that’s more in a popular belief and in contrary to that, they do try to adhere to their medication scheme however it is the severe debilitating side effects such as uncontrollable tremour, significant weight gain and suicidal thoughts that lead to their non- adherence. It is less of a problem now with new generation anti-psychotic medications, however old or classical anti-psychotics are still being used.
  5. Schizophrenic patients can not work and they’re not safe to employ - Not true! If their symptoms are controlled they can be decent employees just like the rest of the human population, however if they are suffering from certain symptoms, rather than firing them please ask their carer or them to review their conditions with their doctors so that you can give these lovely but vulnerable people a chance to earn a living for themselves and gain some desperately needed confidence in themselves.

I haven’t done a written post like this in a while I do apologise, but this is a popular topic both in society and healthcare. Kindness and empathy for these patients have paramount importance and contribution to their recovery, if you’d like to know anything more about how to manage the condition or help somebody to do it or just curiosity regarding that, please feel free to ask! :)

Jie

tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)
tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)
tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)
tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)
tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)
tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)
tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.
To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»
(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

sciencesourceimages:

Did You Remember To Wash Behind Your Leaves?  
Images BE9287 and BE9294 (SEM of E. Coli Bacteria on Lettuce)
Escherichia coli bacteria on a lettuce leaf congregate at the stomata (respiration openings in the leaves) Their presence may constitute a health hazard and cause severe food poisoning, particularly if the bacteria are toxigenic. They may get onto the vegetables if the water used for irrigation is contaminated with fecal material. Although thorough washing is recommended, electron microscopy shows that the bacteria enter the leaves through the stomata and would resist being removed. Similar bacterial contamination was also found with spinach and green onions.
As we strive to eat a more healthy diet we’re finding that even our fresh fruits & vegetables are exposing us to the risks we’d come to expect from meat and fish. In the U.S. alone there have been recent major outbreaks of E. Coli contamination involving produce. Robert Tauxe from the CDC says washing your fruits and vegetable may not be enough. “We recommend washing produce in general, even if you plan to peel it but it’s tough to get bacteria off of greens.” “Many of the recurrent outbreaks have come from leafy greens, especially lettuce, sprouts, and unpasteurized juices and cider.” The CDC urges folks to thoroughly wash their produce and cook it whenever possible.
© Scimat / Science Source
sciencesourceimages:

Did You Remember To Wash Behind Your Leaves?  
Images BE9287 and BE9294 (SEM of E. Coli Bacteria on Lettuce)
Escherichia coli bacteria on a lettuce leaf congregate at the stomata (respiration openings in the leaves) Their presence may constitute a health hazard and cause severe food poisoning, particularly if the bacteria are toxigenic. They may get onto the vegetables if the water used for irrigation is contaminated with fecal material. Although thorough washing is recommended, electron microscopy shows that the bacteria enter the leaves through the stomata and would resist being removed. Similar bacterial contamination was also found with spinach and green onions.
As we strive to eat a more healthy diet we’re finding that even our fresh fruits & vegetables are exposing us to the risks we’d come to expect from meat and fish. In the U.S. alone there have been recent major outbreaks of E. Coli contamination involving produce. Robert Tauxe from the CDC says washing your fruits and vegetable may not be enough. “We recommend washing produce in general, even if you plan to peel it but it’s tough to get bacteria off of greens.” “Many of the recurrent outbreaks have come from leafy greens, especially lettuce, sprouts, and unpasteurized juices and cider.” The CDC urges folks to thoroughly wash their produce and cook it whenever possible.
© Scimat / Science Source

sciencesourceimages:

Did You Remember To Wash Behind Your Leaves?  

Images BE9287 and BE9294 (SEM of E. Coli Bacteria on Lettuce)

Escherichia coli bacteria on a lettuce leaf congregate at the stomata (respiration openings in the leaves) Their presence may constitute a health hazard and cause severe food poisoning, particularly if the bacteria are toxigenic. They may get onto the vegetables if the water used for irrigation is contaminated with fecal material. Although thorough washing is recommended, electron microscopy shows that the bacteria enter the leaves through the stomata and would resist being removed. Similar bacterial contamination was also found with spinach and green onions.

As we strive to eat a more healthy diet we’re finding that even our fresh fruits & vegetables are exposing us to the risks we’d come to expect from meat and fish. In the U.S. alone there have been recent major outbreaks of E. Coli contamination involving produce. Robert Tauxe from the CDC says washing your fruits and vegetable may not be enough. “We recommend washing produce in general, even if you plan to peel it but it’s tough to get bacteria off of greens.” “Many of the recurrent outbreaks have come from leafy greens, especially lettuce, sprouts, and unpasteurized juices and cider.” The CDC urges folks to thoroughly wash their produce and cook it whenever possible.

© Scimat / Science Source

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